Andy Campbell will be making his way to the Chinchilla Science Festival on Saturday.
Andy Campbell will be making his way to the Chinchilla Science Festival on Saturday. Contributed

World-Renowned astrophotographer shoots for town

FROM photographing CEO's and politicians during the day to shooting the other stars on a clear night, photography never ceases to amaze Andrew Campbell.

The professional photographer will make his way to Chinchilla for the World science Festival, where he will have a sit-down chat to share his passion for astrophotography.

Mr Campbell saud his obsession with astrophotography began in 2012 when a friend donated him an old Newtonian telescope.

"I've always been a bit of Scifi, Star Trek type nerd, so it's always been in the blood," he said.

"So, when the telescope was dropped off at my door as a gift for my kids, I was like, 'this is cool.'

"Then I started wondering how you can attach a camera to it and six or seven telescopes later we got hooked."

Since then, his images of celestial bodies have been featured six times in NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day and taken out the 2015 and 2016 Australian Institute of Professional Photography's science, Wildlife and Wild Places Photographer of the Year Award.

He said he was drawn in by the technical skill it takes to photograph something beautiful that can't be seen with the naked eye.

"When you marry the two together, and it comes out working just right, it's quite satisfying to do it," he said.

"A lot of people see this stuff and kind of go 'wow.'

"That's the thing about space; generally it doesn't matter where on Earth you live, what race, breed or colour you are if you get out somewhere where there's no light population and look up you probably look and go wow.

"Sometimes seeing those objects brings it closer to our consciousness and makes us think about what we are seeing, what's our place in the universe, and what's up there."

Mr Campbell will be at Chinchilla Cultural Centre on February 29, from 3.15pm to share why he enjoys spending late nights under the stars with a telescope, even with the risk of spending hours not capturing anything. He will also be showing attendees his photos of deep space objects and astronomical bodies as well as talking about what they are looking and bringing it to a level where kids can get excited about it.

"It's an honour to be invited from Melbourne to talk to these lovely people, and hopefully we can inspire, entertain and put on a good show for them," he said.

"I want to inspire kids to use their imaginations, get off their screens and get out and see stuff that's gobsmacking and amazing."


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