103 Australians have died violently in the first six months of 2018.
103 Australians have died violently in the first six months of 2018. naphtalina (iStock)

The terrifying act that kills four Aussies a week

103 Australians have lost their lives to violence in 2018. All of us have a role to play in lowering this sad toll, writes journalist SHERELE MOODY. 

HASSAN Jeng and Roy Murray lived at opposite ends of Australia, there was a 19-year difference in their ages, one of them was a convicted drug dealer and the other resided in one of Australia's remotest communities.

These men seem different in almost every way, yet they have one terrifying thing in common - they were both stabbed to death on the first day of 2018.

Hassan was a 23-year-old maximum security inmate at Port Phillip Prison and Roy was a 52-year-old resident of Palm Island.

Since these men were killed six months ago, Australia has lost a further 101 people to violence.

That's about four killings a week.

Fellow journalist Katherine Benson and I record violent deaths as they happen.

It is no surprise that our research shows men figure highly as both victims and perpetrators.

Aussie families are mourning the killings of 61 men in the past 26 weeks.

Women are the second most at-risk group, with 33 adult females now dead as a result of someone else's brutality.

And the most heart-breaking statistic of all - nine Aussie kids have lost their lives to violence this year.

Men are suspected in 84 violent deaths and women are suspected in 14.

A number of people were allegedly killed by both genders and police are yet to determine who killed about nine Australians.

Domestic violence is alleged to have played a part in 38 deaths.

Of the 61 male victims, 48 were allegedly killed by other blokes while women stand accused in 10 of these deaths

About 10 of the male killings were attributed to DV - with five male and five female family members charged.

Twenty-nine of the 33 women killed this year allegedly died at the hands of men. Three women are believed to have been killed by other women.

About 21 of the femicides are attributed to domestic or family violence.

One man was responsible for almost half the child killings in Australia in the past six months.

Police are still investigating a number of violent deaths that happened in 2018.
Police are still investigating a number of violent deaths that happened in 2018. MaxPixel

 

 

 

As well as murdering his four grandchildren, Peter Miles shot his daughter Katrina and his wife Cynda at Margaret River in May before ending his own life.

Two men are suspected in the deaths of two other children and one woman has been charged over the death of another child.

We do not know who killed Canberra siblings Ezvin, 8, and five-year-old Furaha Muhoro - they died in a suspicious house fire in Canberra on February 19.

Their mother Anne Wachera was also killed.

NSW had the most killings, with 30 deaths recorded in that state.

Victoria had the second highest number with 27 killings and there were 20 in Queensland.

Stabbing was the primary act of violence with shootings and bashings also figuring highly.

As we move into the second half of 2018, it is important for all Australians to acknowledge the impact of violence on our communities.

For each person lost to violence, there are countless loved ones having to come to terms with these preventable tragedies.

The impact of violence does not end when a person dies. It taints every aspect of the lives of those left behind for many years.

In the saddest of cases, parents lose a child or kids are left parentless with one killed and the other jailed.

Often violence deprives elderly or disabled people of their primary carers.

While we all recognise the trauma violence has on surviving family members, it is also vital to realise that the loved ones of perpetrators will go through their own guilt-ridden emotional hell.

The mental healing cannot begin until after justice is served, and in a lot of cases this process can be glacial.

At the end of the day, all Australians are responsible for lowering the toll of violence.

This is not to say that we are all violent or that we should all take the blame for the intolerable acts of a few bad apples.

The fix is never going to be easy, but it does start with good people challenging the norms that give others a green light to act physically on their rage.

Unless we all stand up to end violence, the need for counting dead Australians will continue. - NewsRegional

News Corp journalist Sherele Moody is the recipient of 2017 Clarion and Walkley Our Watch journalism excellence awards for her coverage of domestic violence issues. Sherele is also the founder of The RED HEART Campaign.

*For 24-hour domestic violence support call the national hotline 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732.

Men are the main victims and perpetrators of violent deaths.
Men are the main victims and perpetrators of violent deaths.

BY THE NUMBERS

2018 toll of violence in Australia

TOTAL AUSTRALIANS KILLED - 103

TOTAL MEN KILLED - 61

TOTAL WOMEN KILLED - 33

TOTAL CHILDREN KILLED - 9

Number of people allegedly killed by men - 84*

Number of people allegedly killed by women - 14*

Number of murders where killer gender is unknown - 8

Alleged domestic or family violence - 38

*Some deaths attributed to male and female perpetrators

Source: The RED HEART Campaign 

 

61-year-old Peter Miles (centre), with his wife Cynda Miles (back), their daughter Katrina Miles (R) and her four children. Peter is believed to have shot his wife, his daughter and his daughters four children in a murder-suicide in Osmington on Friday, May 11, 2018. Picture: Courtesy of Nine News
61-year-old Peter Miles (centre), with his wife Cynda Miles (back), their daughter Katrina Miles (R) and her four children. Peter is believed to have shot his wife, his daughter and his daughters four children in a murder-suicide in Osmington on Friday, May 11, 2018. Picture: Courtesy of Nine News

 

AUSTRALIANS LOST TO VIOLENCE IN 2018

Aaron Marks      13 May

Adrian Tret         5 May

Alfredo Pengue 9 Feb

Alistair William Wilson   25 May

Amelia Blake      13 Jan

Antonia Tatchell                11 Jan

Ayre Cockman   11 May

Barry Moffat      30 May

Boy (unnamed) 8 Jun

Brett Nicholls     3 May

Brodie Moran    8 Mar

Caroline Anne Willis        25 May

Cecelia Haddad 29 Apr

Ezvin Muhoro    20 Feb

Furaha  Muhoro                20 Feb

Christipher "Milo" Holder             30 Mar

Cynda Miles        11 May

David Graves     31 Jan

Debbie Combarngo         6 May

Deon Hewitt       28 May

Edward James Lockyer   29 Jan

Erol Tokcan         9 Mar

Eurydice Dixon  13 Jun

Gail Winner        1 Jun

Garry James Welsh          23 Feb

Gilbert Caetano 20 May

Graeme Thomson            17 Apr

Hassan Jeng       1 Jan

Haydn Butcher  2 Jan

Ho Ledinh            23 Jan

Ingrid Driver Enalanga    Apr 29

Jacob Bell            20 Apr

James Switez-Glowacz   8 Feb

Jason Fry              15 Apr

John Windle       23 Apr

Karen Ashcroft  14 May

Katie Haley         9 Mar

Katrina Miles      11 May

Kay Shirley Dix   27 Mar

Kayden Cockman             11 May

Keith Chaytor     17 Apr

Klaus Petr            13 Jan

Le Ngoc Le          5/6 Feb

Mahmoud Hawi 15 Feb

Male      10 Mar

Margaret Indich 4 Jan

Marija Karovska 25 Feb

Mark Miller         25 May

Mark Russell      25 Feb

Mary Freeman  26 Jan

Michael Horne  1 Jun

Mohammed Salihy          19 Jan

Nancy Barclay    24 Jan

Nicola Manyok-Thiak     14 Mar

Noura Khatib      25 Jan

Phillip Chamberlain         22 Mar

Qi Yu     8 June

Radmila Stevanovic         2 Feb

Rodney Ballis      16 Feb

Rory "Meggs" Elliott        22 Feb

Ros Thomson     17 Apr

Roy Murray        1 Jan

Roystn Batten 1 Apr

Rylan Cockman 11 May

Sally Rothe         4 Feb

Sam Leschke      17 Mar

Scott James Morrison 3 Jan

Simone Fraser   13 Mar

Taye Cockman   11 May

Teah Rose Luckwell         28 Mar

Wachira 'Mario' Phetmang          Unknown date

Unnamed            15 May

Unnamed            21 Mar

Unnamed            24 May

Unnamed            1 Apr

Unnamed            9 Mar

Unnamed            16 Feb

Unnamed            28 Feb

Unnamed            24-25 Feb

Unnamed            3 Mar

Unnamed            9 Mar

Unnamed            17 Mar

Unnamed            27 Mar

Unnamed            18 May

Unnamed            13 Jun

Unnamed            14 Feb

Unnamed            16 Mar

Unnamed            1 Apr

Unnamed            17 Mar

Unnamed            30 Apr

Unnamed            4 May

Unnamed            4 May

Unnamed            27 Mar

Unnamed            17 Apr

Unnamed            3 Jan

Unnamed            26 Apr

Unnamed            24 Apr

Unnamed            8 Jan

Unnamed            14 Jun

Unnamed            18 Jan

Unnamed            18 Jun

Unnamed            28 Jun

Unnamed            Unknown date

 

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