CHAMPIONS: Graham Sells (fourth from left) with his Australian F Class Open Trans-Tasman teammates G. Thomas , D. Shallis (captain), L. Reynolds , G. Warrian (wind coach) , A. Vanwyk and L. Rozsnyai.
CHAMPIONS: Graham Sells (fourth from left) with his Australian F Class Open Trans-Tasman teammates G. Thomas , D. Shallis (captain), L. Reynolds , G. Warrian (wind coach) , A. Vanwyk and L. Rozsnyai. Contributed

Target shoot victory for Australia

Pistol shooting: For Chinchilla local Graham Sells, competing in the F Class Open Trans-Tasman competition brought a world of firsts.

Sells travelled to New Zealand last month to participate in the team event, which had teams from Australian and New Zealand battle for supremacy - the Aussies taking out victory.

Sells said the competition was the first time he'd travelled overseas to compete and his first time competing for his country.

He said taking firearms on an overseas flight was "a daunting process”.

"The paperwork is just horrendous,” he explained.

"It was my first Australian cap - and before I even got my Queensland state cap.”

The competition in New Zealand was fierce.

"F Class Open is considered the Formula One of target shooting, it's the pinnacle of accuracy,” Sells said.

There were about 10 days of practice before the actual event, which Sells said he used to complete hours of shooting and preparation.

"Every night we didn't get to bed until 11 o'clock after cleaning out rifles and making our rounds, then you get up at 6 o'clock in the morning, go to Maccas, get something quick, scoff it down, get to the range, get ready, and shoot all day again from 8.30 till 5pm over four ranges,” Sells said.

"Then you get home back to your unit, scrub your rifle for a good hour, hour and a half, make another 50 rounds, precision-made rounds, and probably more Maccas 'cause it's quick, and shower and bed - and this happened for the 10 days.”

Sells said he enjoyed the competition but was looking forward to a break.

"I'll still keep doing a bit of training out in the paddock on the farm every now and then but definitely semi- retired, put them away.

"I really need to concentrate on my family and my business,” he said.

Sells said he felt very honoured to compete.

"Very humbling and very proud to represent Chinchilla and Australia, and I'm glad we brought home the bacon.”


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