RED AND WHITE: St George Frillneck's Murray Webster has been selected to trial for the Australian Indigenous Rugby Sevens team.
RED AND WHITE: St George Frillneck's Murray Webster has been selected to trial for the Australian Indigenous Rugby Sevens team. St George Frillnecks Rugby Union

St George man selected in Australian Indigenous Sevens Squad

RUGBY UNION: Out of 1500 players throughout Australia across more than 50 communities, Murray Webster has been selected in the top 80 to trial in Sydney for the Australian Indigenous Sevens Rugby Union Team.

In a lengthy tour of most of Australia to unearth future Indigenous Sevens stars, the panel assessed players in a 40m sprint test, ball skills, fitness, how to operate in messy environment with no structure and awareness on the paddock.

But the proud Kamilaroi- Bigambul man had all bases covered.

Standing at 180cm and weighing in at 92kg, playing Number 8 for the St George Frillnecks, Webster has become a force to be reckoned with in the Darling Downs Rugby Union League.

The indigenous legend knows how to turn in it on as a winger as well.

Webster said he was stoked when he received the call about the selection.

"When the selection panel and coaches came to St George they told us only seven per cent are going to make it,” Webster said.

"So I just did my best.

"I thought it's an opportunity and I've got to take it.

"It's a pretty big opportunity and leading up to the finals for footy I've got a very big weekend ahead.”

And Webster is being modest. On Saturday, he will play for the Frillies in the grand final and that night he will fly to Sydney where he will trial on Sunday and Monday for the reduced squad... and if all things go to plan he might just make it back for Mad Monday.

Webster said he was ready to go flat out of the door that was about to open.

"Hopefully the body holds up and we bring home the cookies on Saturday and have a good crack on Sunday,” Webster said.

"I'm feeling pretty proud about it, it'll be good to go down and how everything goes.”

Originally a St George Dragon, Webster said he changed codes to rugby union in Year 8 when he went to boarding school in Brisbane.

"I'm born a leaguey, and still am, but I've come across to play this union game and I nearly say I prefer playing it knowing the opportunities it can give you in life,” Webster said.

"Also I love that part in the game where you can fight for the ball at any point of the game and anywhere.”

During Webster's stint at boarding school, he became good mates with one of his senior students, Moses Sorovi, an indigenous and Torres-Strait man from up north who has become an Australian rugby union player, playing as a scrum-half for the Super Rugby team Queensland Reds.

Webster said he idolised Sorovi.

"I admired him and watched him move through the ranks. He has definitely showed me if you put the hard work in it can show you where you can go,” he said.

"Once I finished boarding school I thought I probably needed to come home for a bit.

"So I've come home and am just loving it.

"You always hear there is a lot more opportunity in the city so when you come back out to a rural community you've just got to take every chance and every opportunity you've got to hit it with full flight.

"If any chances to go further were to arise I would take it.”


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