School trying to bring back corporal punishment

A SCHOOL in the United States is trying to reinstate paddling to punish students, asking parents for their permission to whack their kids on the behind with a paddle.

The Georgia School of Innovation and the Classics, in the south eastern state of Georgia, a kindergarten-through-ninth-grade charter school, sent home permission slips announcing the new discipline policy at the Hephizibah campus, news station WRDW reported.

Superintendent Jody Boulineau said about one-third of the 100 forms returned before Thursday gave consent to strike the students with a wooden board.

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"I've heard, 'Great, it's about time, we're so glad that this is happening again, they should've never taken it out of schools.' All the way to, 'Oh my goodness, I can't believe you are doing that'," Ms Boulineau told WRDW.

According to the policy, students will be taken to an office behind closed doors, where they will place their hands on their knees or a piece of furniture and be struck with a paddle.

School officials said students will not be punished with more than three strikes.

"In this school, we take discipline very seriously," Ms Boulineau told WRDW. "There was a time where corporal punishment was kind of the norm in school and you didn't have the problems that you have."

The controversial policy is still legal in Georgia and 19 other states, according to the news station.

"It's just one more tool that we have in our disciplinary toolbox that we can use," Boulineau said.

This article originally appeared on The New York Post and has been republished here with permission.


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