I’VE been out and about talking to many charity workers over the past few months from Dalby to Charleville, to everywhere in between, but one issue that is often raised with me is the shortage of funds brought about by the coronavirus crisis.

Our charities are vitally important, not just to our communities across the Surat Basin but to the country as a whole.

When farmers are struggling, whether they be in Dalby or Dubbo, there are plenty of kind-hearted charities to lend them a hand.

When someone rolls their motorbike at Quilpie or Kalgoorlie, you can bet the Royal Flying Doctor can give them the health services they need.

But when the money runs dry, these charities simply can’t operate at full capacity and often the people who suffer aren’t heard.

This means another farmer will have to miss out on their much-needed hay bale.

And another rural cancer patient will have to foot the bill for accommodation in Toowoomba or Brisbane.

Unfortunately, with the dire economic situation we’re in, many people and families have had to cut back on their budgets and understandably, donations are often the first thing to go.

We are all trying to survive the pandemic and the recession, but even just a small donation to a charity of your choice can help keep their essential services afloat.

Even just $5 a week.

At the end of the day, could we really afford to lose our charities, and all the good work they do here and across Australia?

Donation links:

Royal Flying Doctor Service

Aussie Helpers

McGrath Foundation

Drought Angels


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