WHIZ KIDS: Origin Energy partnered with the Queensland Minerals and Energy Academy in March to bring the first ever Chatbot program to a combined workshop in Miles. Pic: Contributed
WHIZ KIDS: Origin Energy partnered with the Queensland Minerals and Energy Academy in March to bring the first ever Chatbot program to a combined workshop in Miles. Pic: Contributed

Local students take on future technologies

THE next generation got a leg up learning about the importance of digital technologies, thanks to Origin Energy and the Queensland Minerals Energy Academy who hosted the first ever Chatbot program and combined workshop in Miles.

In mid-March, a group of Year 9 and 10 students from Chinchilla and Miles state high schools took part in the newly developed program, and learnt about digital technologies such as artificial intelligence and coding in the context of the resources sector.

Teams learnt new coding language to solve resources sector scenarios by collaborating to design and program their own chatbots.

Chinchilla State High Year 9 student Jorja said she had a blast learning about new technologies.

"It's a fabulous opportunity for us to have practical hands- on experience which relates to real world applications and expand our knowledge around coding," she said.

"The program has made me think more about opportunities and it is really good to meet other like-minded students interested in technology.

"I'm really looking forward to taking what we've learnt back to school to see how we can use our new skills to solve other problems."

Origin's general manager at Condabri, Talinga and Orana Asset, Alexandra Kennedy-Clark, said she was pleased Origin could work with the QMEA to showcase the workshop in the Western Downs community.

"The workshop opened the discussion about practical uses of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) in a fun session," Ms Kennedy-Clark said.

"It also helps students understand the importance of effective communication.

"You have to understand how humans interact through the chatbot, so the wording used in the programs is understandable by the target audience and the program gets the desired outcomes."

Queensland Resources Council Skills Director Katrina-Lee Jones said it was important the next generation looked to the future.

"AI and automation are increasingly being incorporated in the way we work, and it's important to have programs like this one so that students become excited about potential careers in these areas," Ms Jones said.

Matthew Heskett and Sylvia Clarke from QMEA came from Brisbane to run the workshops and discussed with students exciting opportunities related to new and emerging technologies.

Interactive learning sessions such as these teach students new paperless technologies, time management, communication and collaboration skills.


Revealed: Regions major parties are most under pressure

Premium Content Revealed: Regions major parties are most under pressure

Analysis of the two leaders’ campaigns so far

WARNING: Wild weather heading for Western Downs

Premium Content WARNING: Wild weather heading for Western Downs

THE Western Downs is set to be in the eye of a severe weather system which is...

Truck rollover: Man trapped flown to hospital in serious condition

Premium Content Truck rollover: Man trapped flown to hospital in serious...

PICTURES INSIDE: A driver has been freed from his truck in a serious condition...