News

High-tech trampoline has kids leaping into the future

THE classic backyard trampoline has been given a high-tech twist, incorporating iPad games and sensors to engage children in the digital age.

On Monday, Springfree Trampoline launched the world's first 'Smart Trampoline' in Australia alongside a series of iPad games and apps designed to encourage kids to get outdoors and be more active.

Sensors across the mat connect with an iPad or similar device which can be hooked up to a bracket attached to the netting around the trampoline.

The user would then use their body as a controller for the tablet, jumping up, down or sideways across the trampoline to register their movements.

Springfree's managing director and owner of a Smart Trampoline Leanne Fretwell said the games, which range from educational problem-solving exercises to virtual fruit-squashing competitions, can be enjoyed by children of almost every age.

"My boy is six, and it's amazing how quickly he's learned to use it," she said.

"I was watching him the other day, and he had [our trampoline] configured upside down, and it was quite interesting to watch him figure that out with a few little jumps here and there and work through those cognitive skills."

AIR TIME: Lewis Fretwell tests out the new 'Smart Trampoline'.
AIR TIME: Lewis Fretwell tests out the new 'Smart Trampoline'. Warren Lynam

The Kunda Park company's marketing manager Phillip Hay said the early feedback they've had suggests kids are using the smart trampolines to get outside more frequently and for longer.

He said the 'smart' factor meant it was easy for children and adults to forget they were exercising while bouncing.

"If you told me I had to go outside and do a 40 minute run, that's just not appealing," he said.

"But if I'm squashing aliens or fruit, you don't realise how quickly the time has gone and you don't realise you're actually burning a lot of calories.

"You use almost every muscle in the body and the cardiovascular side is great too."

There are even workouts incorporating star jumps and bottom drops for fit-minded parents, although Ms Fretwell admitted she was more attracted to the playful games.

"I'm really competitive, so I haven't really done the fitness development ones, just the games," she laughed.

"You can have a family leaderboard for some competition within the family or we have a global leaderboard you can compete on."

Mr Hay said the company also had a software development kit available for young people interested in coding or software design to create their own games for the trampoline.

"Our apps are open-sourced, so kids can come up with their own games, challenges or apps to be submitted for commercial consideration," he said.

"We currently have 13 apps available, but this time next year it could be 113."

Springfree Trampolines recently won two of the Australian Good Design Awards for product design in the Sport and Lifestyle sub-category and digital design in the Interface Design sub-category.

Topics:  business exercise health kids kids activities technology


Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

MP seeks LNP endorsement to run for Warrego

The current Warrego / Callide / Condamine / Nanango / Southern Downs electoral boundaries.

Sitting MP seeks second run in seat of Warrego

MELON FEST: unprecedented boost for local businesses

DOWN AND STICKY: The Melon Bungy event became a melon food fight at times.

Sales reportedly up by incredible 500% for Melon Festival weekend.

Origin to move staff into region's towns

Origin's operational workforce will be moved out of the Condabri camp by September.

Permanent Origin staff to move into towns

Local Partners

'I wasn't naked': Blanca Blanco speaks out

BLANCA Blanco made headlines around the world after 'accidentally' flashing, but she says she was actually wearing a nude bodysuit.

‘IT’S A LITTLE SAD’: Trump makes Oscars bungle all about him

US President Donald Trump claims Hollywood's elite were too busy mocking him to pay attention on Oscars night.

Donald Trump ‘explains’ Oscars stuff up.

Lama and Sarah’s ‘epic’ MKR fail

My Kitchen Rules contestants Lama and Sarah.

Tempers flare as Lebanese feast turns into an epic fail.

Oscars 2017: How did biggest award get stuffed up?

Presenter Warren Beatty shows the envelope with the actual winner for best picture as host Jimmy Kimmel, left, looks on at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. The winner was originally announced as La La Land, but was later corrected to Moonlight.

'Guys in headsets starting buzzing around. They took the envelope.'

Lisa Curry can't marry her fiance

Lisa Curry breaks down in the jungle.

Lisa Curry says she can’t get married to her fiance

The true cause of the Oscars bungle

Faye Dunaway, left, and Warren Beatty present the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

The Oscars ended with a moment that left everyone speechless.

HUGE OSCARS FAIL: Wrong film handed Best Picture award

Presenter Warren Beatty shows the envelope with the actual winner for best picture as host Jimmy Kimmel, left, looks on at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. The winner was originally announced as La La Land, but was later corrected to Moonlight.

IN A monumental stuff-up, La La Land incorrectly named Best Picture.

Casino boss loses $4m on waterfront Sunshine Coast home

The owner of this stunning Noosa home accepted much less than he had initially wanted for the home.

When illness struck owner forced to try and cash out of property

Mining homes dive: $600k homes sell for $120k-$300k

18 Yeates Street, Moranbah sold for $135,000 in December, after being repossessed by a bank. The owners bought for $545,000 in August, 2011.

The economy still has two speeds, but with a painful twist

Mackay's property market climbing like a Rocket Man

Renewed confidence in Mackay means more homes are being snapped up by those eager to plant their roots in the region.

There's movement in the real estate sector and it's all positive.

'Why we drove 800km to buy a treehouse with a disco ball'

The new owners have planned a few updates, but will stick with much of the original design.

A couple travelled almost 800km for the home of their dreams.

The trick homeowners are using to buy more properties

Chantelle Subritzky leaves her home each week for Airbnb guests.

Queenslanders are going down this path to help pay their mortgages

Ready to SELL your property?

Post Your Ad Here!