A car roll over in the Piggabeen Valley yesterday near Sand Lane. Photo: Gordon Spear
A car roll over in the Piggabeen Valley yesterday near Sand Lane. Photo: Gordon Spear

HARROWING: First on scene of crash checked for a pulse

A CAR rollover in a Tweed valley has renewed calls for road safety and diligent driving to conditions from residents.

Piggabeen Valley local of 40-years Gordon Spear was first on the scene of a single-car crash that hit a tree and rolled on Piggabeen Rd near Sandy Lane about 4pm on Monday.

Mr Spear described the heart-stopping moment he came across a young woman, one of four people in the car, lying motionless.

"I saw one of the girls in shock tell her to wake up," he said.

"I felt a pulse at her neck but felt nothing probably because my own heart was racing.

"I put my hand to her mouth and felt a slight wind."

As the young woman started to 'fit', Mr Spear applied first aid and stayed with her until paramedics arrived.

A NSW Ambulance spokesman confirmed a male and three female patients were treated at the scene by paramedics and two patients were transported to hospital.

It is understood a 17-year-old female suffered back injuries and two other females were also treated for arm and leg injuries.

 

A car roll over in the Piggabeen Valley yesterday near Sand Lane. Photo: Gordon Spear
A car roll over in the Piggabeen Valley yesterday near Sand Lane. Photo: Gordon Spear

 

The cause of crash is still being investigated by police.

Mr Spear said a local had even put up their own sign on the junction of Cobaki and Piggabeen road near the bridge with words to the effect of 'Stay on your side of the road before there is a head on'.

"It's a country road so it has potholes and loose bitumen and patched areas all through the valley," he said.

Mr Spear's son and fellow valley resident Bryan Spear said the area was a well-known 'hooning' hotspot and Piggabeen and Cobaki residents were sick of it.

"Cars are constantly ripping up Arthur and Lillian Keys Park," he said.

"It's only a matter of time before someone is badly hurt."

Residents said they have brought the issue to the police station however were told unless officer's witnessed it there is nothing they can do.

Susan Gallagher is one of a few residents who have written to their Tweed MP Geoff Provest about the community's concerns.

"As we have no speed limit, police can't enforce it," she said.

"However they (police) urge us to contact them when we hear hoons. But by the time they get out here they will be gone."

In her letter to Mr Provest, Ms Gallagher said the valley had no defences against hooning behaviour.

"We have no cameras or no speed signs … Our roads are not safe, unsealed in areas, little or no road markings and frequent livestock and wildlife present. All of this is manageable with care and common sense," she said.

"We need help solving this issue. I have children and I wish dearly that they will be safe on our country roads.

"We are a great friendly community who would be devastated if one of these "hoons" wiped a community member out."

NSW Police have been contacted for comment.


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