DOWN THE LOO: Matthew William Halliday faced Dalby Magistrates Court on three charges. Picture: File
DOWN THE LOO: Matthew William Halliday faced Dalby Magistrates Court on three charges. Picture: File

Drunk Dalby man makes a mess of watch house cell

A MIDDLE-aged Dalby man had to explain to a magistrate why he flushed a police blanket down a watch house toilet and covered his cell's cameras with wet toilet paper.

Matthew William Halliday, 42, represented himself in Dalby Magistrates Court for the embarrassing moment on August 30, which led to him being charged with two counts of obstructing police, and one count of wilful damage of police property.

Police prosecutor senior constable Jodie Tahana said police attended an address in Dalby for another matter about 7pm, when they took up with the retail worker.

The court heard police had attempted to direct Halliday out of the house to a police car, when he became aggressive.

"He threw his shoes to the ground and refused with comply to police directions to accompany them to the vehicle," she said.

"He was warned by police that if he continued to act aggressively he would be obstructing them in their duties."

Police told Halliday to stop tensing his arms and resisting police, but refused to listen, which led to him being restrained.

The court heard he was transported to the Dalby watch house where he was lodged in a cell, monitored by a closed circuit television system.

Halliday's absurd behaviour began about 10.08pm while he was in custody, when he took a blanket owned by the Queensland Police Service and attempted to flush it down the toilet.

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Police had to enter the cell to retrieve the blanket, however it had appeared to be soiled, and had to be thrown out.

Halliday then obstructed police further by placing wet toilet paper on the closed circuit camera within his cell, preventing a police officer from doing his duty as a watch house supervisor.

Magistrate Tracy Mossop told Halliday that it "wasn't [his] finest hour", and asked him if he had anything to say about what he did.

Halliday told the court the offence was "regrettable", saying he didn't drink anymore, as he was intoxicated at the time.

Magistrate Mossop said this was another example of "poor behaviour that our police have to tolerate" in the line of duty.

"I really don't understand why people get into a watch house where they give you a blanket, an item of comfort, and yet you want to flush it down the toilet," she said.

"I just don't get it."

Magistrate Mossop however commended Halliday's pledge to discontinue his drinking.

Halliday pleaded guilty to all charges and was fined $650.

Convictions weren't recorded.


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