HELPING HANDS: Drought Angels Shannon Thompson, Margaret Hazard and Terry Dwyer  prepare care packages for next week's North Queensland flood relief delivery.
HELPING HANDS: Drought Angels Shannon Thompson, Margaret Hazard and Terry Dwyer prepare care packages for next week's North Queensland flood relief delivery. Kate McCormack

Drought Angels head north for flood victims

CHINCHILLA Drought Angels have been helping farmers battle on for more than five years now, but on Monday they will embark on their toughest challenge to date.

Four Ways, a community in Far North Queensland, 200km north of Cloncurry, is still experiencing the aftermath of this month's flooding.

Properties of all sizes are riddled with the stench of thousands of dead animals, entire stations have been washed away and homes lost.

Burke and Wills Roadhouse manager Shauna Johns said there was an overwhelming sense of heartbreak throughout the community.

"Entire stations have been lost, the flood didn't discriminate between large farming companies and smaller family-run stations,” Ms Johns said.

"It just annihilated everything in it's it's path.”

Ms Johns reached out to Drought Angels in the hope of receiving several dozen care packages for local women who were forced to go without the most basic of necessities.

Drought Angels answered the call and will not only send care packages but will now deliver two roadtrains packed to the brim with supplies for the entire Four Ways community.

"We're sending everything from clothing to calf formula,” Drought Angel Jenny Gailey said.

"We're packing at least 50 pallets right now with food hampers, bedding, water, toiletries and dog biscuits,” she said.

With most of the flood relief taking place in Townsville, it's been easy for the public to overlook some of the smaller, more remote communities.

"They all feel forgotten up there, no-one is getting any help and there's dead animals everywhere,” Tash Johnston said.

"The clean-up alone is going to be a lot of hard work.

"We are calling out to anyone who can commit themselves to the cause for 10 days to come up with us and help get this community back on its feet.

"Food and fuel costs will be covered but you'll need a strong stomach and a swag or tent as we can't provide accommodation for everyone,” Ms Johnston said.

Ms Gailey said people unable to commit their time could still help.

"We're also asking people to help by baking Anzac biscuits and fruit cakes as a reminder to those struggling that someone cares,” she said.

With time being of the essence volunteer numbers need to be finalised by Saturday, February 23, and baked donations to be dropped into the Drought Angels centre, on Malduf St, by Sunday.

To get behind the cause financially you can head to the Drought Angels site here.

For more information or to volunteer call the Drought Angels on 0436343463.


Chinchilla students awarded engineering scholarships

Chinchilla students awarded engineering scholarships

Four Chinchilla school leavers are set to build a bright future.

Regional water price cripples rural users

Regional water price cripples rural users

Western Downs standpipe charges among Aust's dearest.

Man injured after 't-boning' truck

Man injured after 't-boning' truck

A man has minor injuries after a crash with a B-double.