In a first for Test cricket, England paceman Stuart Broad has copped a whopping fine from his own father after an on-field outburst.
In a first for Test cricket, England paceman Stuart Broad has copped a whopping fine from his own father after an on-field outburst.

Ashes villain cops hefty fine from dad

England cricketer Stuart Broad has been fined 15 per cent of his match fee for breaching the ICC code of conduct during last week's Test match against Pakistan.

On day four of the Manchester fixture, Broad dismissed Pakistan's Yasir Shah in the second innings after the lower order batsman was caught behind for a quick-fire 33.

As Shah made his way off the field, the English bowler offered a few unsavoury words of advice, which was found to have breached Article 2.5 of the code of conduct.

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Broad was therefore fined 15 per cent of his match fee - equivalent to around $2600 - and handed a demerit point, bringing his current tally to three. If the 34-year-old receives another demerit point during this week's second Test against Pakistan, he will be banned from competing in the final match of the series at the Ageas Bowl.

Broad admitted to "using language, actions or gestures which disparage or which could provoke an aggressive reaction from a batter" and accepted the sanction without appeal.

 

Incredibly, the ICC match referee who handed down the sanction was his father, Chris Broad.

A former England representative himself, the elder Broad has served as an ICC referee since 2003. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the ICC has opted to use local officials for England's home summer, which is uncommon in contemporary cricket.

Stuart is the first Test cricketer in history to be fined by his father.

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Last month, Broad spoke to the Mail on Sunday about the possibility his father would be required to officiate a match in the home summer due to COVID-19 restrictions.

"Sure, if he was an umpire I could understand that because he could have a subconscious influence on decisions that are made on the field," Broad said.

"No offence to him here but he sits in an office and if I, or anyone else, breaks the code of conduct he simply looks up the regulations in a handbook and determines the appropriate sanction from the relevant section.

"There is no emotion in a match referee's job. From experience - and I've played 138 Tests - you only see a match ref if you're in trouble. Often they are sat in a different building. You only tend to meet at breakfast in the hotel or on the outfield before the start of play. From a selfish point of view, I'd love the chance to be able to have a coffee and catch-up with dad in a bio-secure environment."

The second Test between England and Pakistan in Southampton commences on Thursday, with the hosts currently leading the series 1-0.

 

Originally published as Ashes villain cops hefty fine from dad


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