A HELPING HAND: The Australian Army Band Brisbane descended on Chinchilla to help out at the Drought Angels warehouse.
A HELPING HAND: The Australian Army Band Brisbane descended on Chinchilla to help out at the Drought Angels warehouse. Brooke Duncan

Army band lends Angels' a hand

THE Drought Angels have called in the army to help improve their warehouse efficiency.

Members of the Australian Army Band Brisbane toured rural Queensland last week to perform and lend a hand to several communities, including a stop in Chinchilla on Tuesday afternoon.

The 14-member band, known as The Rising Suns, had been raising money for the Angels' cause back in Brisbane but wanted to do more.

The project officer for this year's tour, Sergeant Adam Corning, said when Drought Angels approached them and asked if they'd like to help, the band jumped at the chance.

"We don't get to do this hardly ever. When a flood comes through or a bushfire comes through, certain army units that are equipped to deal with drought relief and flood relief go and bands generally don't. It's not their primary role,” Sgt Corning explained.

"It was a different way to give back as opposed to just putting on a concert.”

Drought Angels director Jenny Gailey said what the band achieved in the space of four hours was "mind blowing”.

"We managed to get a couple of pallets ready to actually ship out the door, we got a couple of pallets ready for our drought run, and everything has been put away and stored correctly,” she said.

"One of the ladies actually used to work in a warehouse and so she knew how to use our wrapping machine and everything, so it's all been wrapped and stacked properly and it's just such a godsend.

"Moving forward, the impact of just that small little window of four hours will carry on, we will actually be able to get so much more stuff out.

"They were so much fun and they worked so well together as a team. it was fantastic, it was lovely to have them here.”

But the day wasn't done for The Rising Suns, who rounded off the stop with a special performance at the Club Hotel Chinchilla.

The stop was just one of many for the band, who kicked off their tour in Longreach with a performance to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the local RSL, before hitting the road again to perform in Quilpie.

The band put on a free concert for the home town of Lance Corporal Stjepan 'Ricky' Milosevic of 2/14 LHR (QMI), who was tragically killed in Afghanistan in 2012.

Next up was Charleville, where the band played a gig to remember at the Cosmos Centre and Observatory against a backdrop of deep red dirt and an orange sunset.

After Chinchilla, the band headed to Dalby where they performed a lunchtime concert at Dalby Christian College before leading a workshop with music students.

For Drought Angels, the band's help has been invaluable.

Nonetheless, there's always more work to be done and the charity is on the lookout for volunteers.

If you would like to help , call into the Drought Angels charity shop in Malduf St.


Haunted by a ghostly tick-tock

Haunted by a ghostly tick-tock

An unexplainable tick-tock

Condamine Alliance farewells 16 years of history

Condamine Alliance farewells 16 years of history

Reflecting on 16 years of conservation

Former Chinchilla Bowls patroness turns 100

Former Chinchilla Bowls patroness turns 100

Photo Gallery from Gwen Willmington's birthday bash!

Local Partners