President Donald Trump shows an amended Hurricane Dorian path with a new black circle added. Picture: Evan Vucci/ AP Photo
President Donald Trump shows an amended Hurricane Dorian path with a new black circle added. Picture: Evan Vucci/ AP Photo

Altered hurricane map proves Trump ‘right’

US President Donald Trump appears to have altered a map of Hurricane Dorian's devastating path after his false claim that the storm would hit the state of Alabama was mocked.

In a video issued by the White House on Wednesday, Mr Trump holds up a map of the storm that appears to have been altered with a black texta to extend the path of the deadly storm.

It comes after Mr Trump issued a tweet at the weekend saying the monster hurricane was headed for Alabama.

The Alabama office of the National Weather Service quickly responded to the tweet insisting that "Alabama will NOT see any impacts from #Dorian".

Here's Trump's original tweet:

 

And here's the new map Trump held up during a press conference on Wednesday:

 

It looks as though someone’s drawn black marker on the map to correct Trump’s error. Picture: Evan Vucci/AP Photo
It looks as though someone’s drawn black marker on the map to correct Trump’s error. Picture: Evan Vucci/AP Photo

A photo on the White House Flickr account from August 29 shows the original map that was used with no black marker on it.

 

No black marker when Trump, joined by Vice President Mike Pence, received a briefing update on Hurricane Dorian as it approached the US mainland on August 29. Picture: Official White House Photo
No black marker when Trump, joined by Vice President Mike Pence, received a briefing update on Hurricane Dorian as it approached the US mainland on August 29. Picture: Official White House Photo

"We had, actually, our original chart was that it was going to be hit - hitting Florida directly," Mr Trump said in the video, holding up the chart.

"That was the original chart. It could've, uh, was going towards the Gulf."

Trump is known for using black texta to sign legislation.

Asked about the marking on the map, Mr Trump told reporters he did not know how it got there.

"We had many models, each line being a model, and they were going directly through," he said.

"And in all cases, Alabama was hit, if not lightly, then in some cases, pretty hard.

"They actually gave that a 95 per cent chance probability. It turned out that that was not what happened. It made the right turn up the coast. But Alabama was going to be hit very hard, along with Georgia. But under the current, they won't be."

While governors of other stars declared emergencies as the hurricane drew closer, Alabama's did not.

Trump also issued a tweet backing himself up further.

 

 

 

HURRICANE DORIAN INTENSIFIES

Hurricane Dorian has now intensified back to a Category 3 storm and is threatening to flood low-lying coasts from Georgia to southwest Virginia with a dangerous storm surge after its deadly mauling of the Bahamas.

Dorian had crashed into the island nation as its strongest hurricane on record leaving widespread devastation and at least 20 people dead.

But it weakened substantially in the days since, dropping from a Category 5 to a Category 2 storm before increasing again.

Dorian still boasted dangerously high winds of 185km/h as it churned north toward the Carolinas while pushing crashing waves onshore.

More than 1500 people sought refuge in 28 shelters in South Carolina, where sheets of rain began falling late Wednesday in the historic port city of Charleston, located on a peninsula prone to flooding.

 

The devastation left in Great Abaco, Bahamas. Picture: Scott Olson/Getty Images
The devastation left in Great Abaco, Bahamas. Picture: Scott Olson/Getty Images

 

Whole houses have been destroyed. Picture: Scott Olson/Getty Images
Whole houses have been destroyed. Picture: Scott Olson/Getty Images

As Dorian crept dangerously closer, winds picked up sending rain sheets sideways, thunder boomed in the night sky and power flickered on and off in places.

Though weakened, Dorian remained a force to be reckoned with, its swirling circle of winds and rain wrapped around a large, gaping eye visible on photos taken from space.

At 11pm Wednesday US time, the distinct eye of the hurricane churned about 168km south of Charleston, moving north at 11km/h off the coast.

In Charleston's downtown, stores and restaurants were boarded up with wood and corrugated metal and about 830,000 people were under mandatory evacuation orders on the South Carolina coast.

Hundreds of thousands also were ordered off the Georgia coast.

A flood chart posted by the National Weather Service projected a combined high tide and storm surge around Charleston Harbor of 3.1m. The record 4m was set by Hugo in 1989.

"We are very worried, especially about the barrier islands getting cut off," Governor Brian Kemp said.

- with wires


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