Alleged gang members may be deported after deadly attack

 

Teenagers and men involved in an alleged violent gang attack in Brisbane's northside are being investigated by Home Affairs to see if they could face deportation if found guilty.

It is understood that at least four of the young men are candidates for visa cancellation under character grounds, from alleged brawls in Zillmere and Queen Street Mall last month.

It would follow similar steps to what happened in Melbourne with the APEX gangs.

There have been 12 men, aged 18 to 32, charged with the murder of 19-year-old Girum Mekonnen, who was stabbed to death last month, as well as acts intended to cause grievous bodily harm, affray, and disobedience of a lawful order.

 

Girum Mekonnen has been identified as the young man who lost his life in an alleged gang fight at Zillmere. Picture: Facebook
Girum Mekonnen has been identified as the young man who lost his life in an alleged gang fight at Zillmere. Picture: Facebook

The incident shocked the community, in which a group of men alleged used "bats and edged blades" to attack 13 victims in a violent brawl.

Four men, aged 18 to 19, were charged with ­attempted murder following a separate incident where a 16-year-old boy was stabbed in the chest and back in Queens Street Mall.

Lawyers for the men allegedly involved in the incidents have said that they are not part of a gang.

Federal Government departments are working with police to determine the visa status of the men involved, in what will stand as a stark warning.

Visas of more than 40 APEX gang members and associates in Victoria have been cancelled, with the Home Affairs department working closely with the Victorian police on the issue.

Police at the scene of the alleged murder at Zillmere. Picture: Peter Wallis
Police at the scene of the alleged murder at Zillmere. Picture: Peter Wallis

Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton said any gang members were on notice.

"My department works very closely with the police to identify non-citizens who have broken the law and could potentially face deportation," he said.

"99 per cent of people who come here do the right thing, but if you don't then you are not welcome in Australia.

"To date we have cancelled more than 6900 visas."

Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton says non-citizens who have broken the law potentially face deportation. Picture: NCA NewsWire/Dan Peled
Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton says non-citizens who have broken the law potentially face deportation. Picture: NCA NewsWire/Dan Peled

A Department of Home Affairs spokesman said they did not comment on individual cases, but that it works with law enforcement agencies and Australian Border Force to identify and, where appropriate, cancel visas for people taking part in criminal activity.

"The Australian Government takes seriously its responsibility to protect the community from the risk of harm arising from non-citizens who choose to engage in criminal activity or serious conduct of concern," he said.

Section 501 of the Migration Act means there is a mandatory visa cancellation if someone is convicted and sentenced to a year or more in prison, while there is also a character test which includes criminal record, associations with people with a criminal record and risk over future conduct.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Originally published as Alleged gang members may be deported after deadly attack


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